BP to Drill in North Sea Parcel

Tuesday, September 6, 2011 @ 03:09 PM gHale


BP and its partners will invest up to $1.1 billion to develop the Kinnoull reservoir in the North Sea.

BP said Kinnoull holds 45 million barrels of oil equivalent, and the investment will extend production beyond 2020 with a peak rate of 45,000 barrels a day. The new facilities should come on line in 2013.

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BP holds a 77 percent stake in the reservoir, Eni SpA has 16.7 percent and Summit Oil International 6.3 percent.

To allay any fears of an oil spill like the one that plagued the Gulf of Mexico, engineers will unveil two rival oil spill-capping devices this week.

Wild Well Control designed one of the containment systems and it costs $40 million. Texas-based Wild Well Control is the company that helped BP finally put a stop to its Macondo leak. The company – also known for putting out fires in Kuwait during the 1991 war with Iraq – will offer its new product to customers globally, but they are targeting it at Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

In the newly competitive world of spill containment, Wild Well Control is marketing the device as “the proven, industry, best-in-class solution” based on elements “designed and fabricated for the first time during the challenging and complicated period of the Macondo incident.”

Meanwhile, a dedicated oil cap for Britain, created by the biggest players in the North Sea and trade body Oil and Gas UK, should fit any well drilled in Britain to a depth of 10,000 feet. It has taken seven months to construct and UK company Oil Spill Response will looked after it.

After BP's Deepwater Horizon rig exploded causing a giant oil leak last year in the Gulf of Mexico, it became clear no device to cap a heavily leaking oil well existed.

After BP's Deepwater Horizon rig exploded causing a giant oil leak last year in the Gulf of Mexico, it became clear no device to cap a heavily leaking oil well existed.

“Despite the fact that there has not been a major loss of well control in the UK in more than 20 years of offshore operations, we believe that having such a contingency device here in the UK is essential, as it allows a quick response no matter how unlikely a scenario this is,” said James L House, chairman of the UK’s Oil Spill Prevention Response and Advisory Group (OSPRAG) and managing director of Apache North Sea.

After BP’s Gulf of Mexico rig exploded causing a giant oil leak last year, it became clear that no device to cap a heavily leaking oil well existed. BP had to construct and experiment with a series of designs before finally capping the well after three months of oil gushing into the ocean.



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