CA Cites 2 Companies for Fatal Incidents

Tuesday, September 19, 2017 @ 05:09 PM gHale


Two employees died in two separate incidents at two different companies and California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Cal OSHA) issued safety fines.

In one incident, Aero Pacific Corp. in Placenta, CA, is facing $51,160 in fines for safety violations after a worker was struck and killed by a moving spindle, according to a Cal OSHA report.

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In addition, in a separate case, RWC Building products in San Marcos, CA, is facing $68,435 in fines for five citations, including a fatality, Cal OSHA said.

In the first cast, inspectors determined that, among other violations, Aero Pacific failed to identify and correct machinery hazards in the workplace, and train workers on the control of hazardous energy.

Investigators found the employer failed to train all authorized employees on hazardous energy control procedures and the hazards related to performing cleaning, setting-up and adjusting the CNC milling machines used at the facility, as required by this subsection.

Serious violation for repair work and setting up operations. On January 20 an employee suffered a fatal injury while setting up the operation of the Viper CNC milling machine. The subject machine was not locked out or positively sealed in the “off” position and was still running while the employee was performing a set-up operation.

They also received a serious violation for lack of machine guarding.

They also face a serious violation for control of hazardous energy for the cleaning, repairing, servicing, setting up, and adjusting operations of prime movers, machinery and equipment, including lockout/tagout.

Investigators found the company failed to have an injury and illness prevention program where the employer failed to identify, evaluate and correct hazards that occur in or on machinery and/or equipment used in the workplace. In addition, the employer failed to identify, evaluate and correct the unsafe work practices of the machine operators who routinely clean, set-up and adjust CNC Milling Machines while the machines are running.

Control of hazardous energy for the cleaning, repairing, servicing, setting up, and adjusting operations of prime movers, machinery and equipment, including lockout/tagout where the employer failed to develop and include in their “Lockout Tagout Blockout” Program a hazardous energy control procedure that specifically outlined the scope, purpose, authorization, rules and techniques for employees to use when cleaning, setting-up or adjusting machinery and equipment as required by this subsection.

In a separate investigation, Cal/OSHA issued five citations and $68,435 in penalties to RWC Building Products in San Marcos following the death of a worker Feb. 11 who fell from a truck-mounted conveyor belt.

Inspectors concluded that the company failed to ensure that workers were wearing approved personal fall protection equipment while unloading material onto a roof, did not perform periodic inspections to identify unsafe conditions and work practices at different job delivery sites, and failed to provide effective training for supervisors to recognize safety and health hazards.

A serious violation was when the employer failed to ensure the truck-mounted conveyor was used in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations as a result an employee fell from the rooftop of a 3-story building, to his death while attempting to ride the conveyor belt down.

A serious violation was for the employer failing to ensure employees were wearing approved personal fall arrest, personal fall restraint or positioning systems while unloading roofing material on to a roof of a 3-story building approximately 30 feet in height.

Another serious violation was for the employer not having an established, implemented and maintaining an effective Injury and Illness Prevention Program.

Inspectors found the company lacked an injury and illness prevention program. During the investigation, the training records of employees did not have the name of the training providers as required by this subsection.

In addition, the company needed to have a heat illness prevention plan. The employer needs to establish, implement, and maintain, an effective heat illness prevention plan.



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