IA Gasoline Spill Contained

Wednesday, March 16, 2016 @ 11:03 AM gHale


A corroded plug in an ethanol gasoline pipeline caused a spill of 30,000 gallons of the fuel at a Sioux City, IA, tank farm late last week.

Crews did such a thorough job of containing the spill, however, that no fuel reached the Floyd River, federal officials said.

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What contaminants spilled into a creek has been completely contained, and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) could be leaving the Magellan Pipeline Company this week.

“With any large storage facility there’s always a possibility of a discharge,” said Randy Brown, On-Scene Coordinator of the Environmental Protection Agency. ”

On Friday, 30,000 gallons of gasoline leaked into the ground and nearby creek at Magellan Pipeline Company. The source of the leak was a corroded plug in an 83 percent ethanol gasoline pipeline. Upon further examination of the site, they found more just like it.

“There were several others but they’re in the process of replacing those,” Brown said.

The Environmental Protection Agency has been assisting Magellan on-site with the clean up. Their primary focus was containing the contamination zone. A nearby creek was located in the contamination zone and the EPA feared the leak would spill into the Floyd River. The area, however, ended up contained before any gas could reach the river.

“The creek really has not shown any signs for the past several days of any remaining product,” Brown said.

With clean-up of the ground water almost complete, the EPA is looking to depart Magellan, but Bruce Heine, the director of government and media affairs said the cleanup of soil and groundwater will continue for years to come.

“Every incident of this nature, regardless of its size, is a very important issue to us and we’ll take lessons learned from this to do everything we can to prevent something like this from happening again,” Heine said.

As for the next steps, the EPA plans to finish their oversight of the surface water clean-up before handing authority back into the state of Iowa for the remainder of the clean-up. Magellan will continue to evaluate the extent of the product loss and utilize the most efficient means possible to recover the gas and fix damages.

With the spill, Magellan lost two days of operation of their truck loading rack but the site fully reopened Monday morning.