OIC: Security Underlying Message

Wednesday, March 25, 2015 @ 03:03 PM gHale


By Gregory Hale
Whether it is a manufacturing automation summit or an IT conference, security is always an underlying message that plays into any industry.

The second message always comes back to people and how important they are in building relationships and solving problems and issues. Yes, technology is vital, but people are the key.

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“The message is you have a chance to thrive if you change,” said Oracle Chief Executive Mark Hurd during his Wednesday keynote at Oracle Industry Connect (OIC) 2015 in Washington, DC. “You have a chance to thrive. You also have a chance to go away if you don’t adapt. Those who have the ability to communicate, talk, sell to, nurture, and evolve the relationship with the customer will win.”

“Forty percent of workers can leave the workforce in the next three years,” Hurd said. But other interesting numbers show 56 percent of millennials hitting the workforce choose flexibility over more pay. Plus, workers have a greater tendency to leave their jobs after three years, he said. In short, the new workers coming in will be a tough customer further on down the road because they have different standards and ways they conduct themselves and the way they do business.

That means companies have to adapt and understand who their new customers are going to be and know what they are looking for.

Whether it is people or technology, the underlying message seems to always come back to security. Throw a discussion of the ever popular topic of the cloud into the mix and concerns come to the forefront.

Bob Weiler, senior vice president of global business units at Oracle said he could agree more, but he said one thing the company focuses on is security as the product they build design in security and not just bolt it on after they complete the product.

“The first bureaucratic issue smaller companies have to go through is getting a product ready to for launch,” Weiler said. “They finish the code on Monday and by Wednesday the release goes out. At Oracle, we go through a process of 3-6 months on top of a release just to attack code and find vulnerabilities. Oracle has a process to teach engineers to put in security before hand and not as an afterthought. When our customers see the level of security that we put in, they feel comfortable (in the cloud).

“The bad news is when we buy a company, they say what do you mean we have to wait 3-6 months? They have to learn the Oracle way.”



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