Safety Violations at Steel Company

Friday, August 9, 2013 @ 04:08 PM gHale


Hanna Steel Corp. is facing $117,500 in fines for 15 safety violations following a February inspection at the company’s Northport, AL, facility, conducted as part of the agency’s national emphasis program on amputations, according to Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) officials.

Two repeat violations, with $60,500 in proposed penalties, include failing to develop, document and utilize procedures for potentially hazardous energy during servicing and maintenance of equipment.

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Hanna Steel, which manufactures steel tubing and pre-painted steel, also failed to ensure guards and work rests on the grinders ended up properly adjusted. A repeat violation exists when an employer previously faced citations for the same or a similar violation of a standard, regulation, rule or order at any facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years. The company faced the same violations in July 2009.

Nine serious safety violations, with $55,900 in penalties, include failing to select and require appropriate hand protection for workers exposed to hazards; provide hardware to secure and block machines from energy sources while changing shims on a bearing block; conduct periodic inspections for specific procedures on equipment; provide training on the purpose and function of the energy control program; remove forklifts from service that had damaged tires and a broken pendant control panel; provide protective screens or personal protective equipment; and prevent worker exposure to unguarded and rotating parts on equipment.

A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

Four other-than-serious violations, with $1,100 in proposed penalties, were for failing to post an OSHA 300A log, provide Appendix D to workers wearing respirators, establish and implement a respirator protection program and properly label chemical containers. An other-than-serious violation is one that has a direct relationship to job safety and health, but probably would not cause death or serious physical harm.

“Hanna Steel previously was cited for some of the same violations found during the 2009 inspection. It is aware of what actions need to be taken to protect its workers,” said Ramona Morris, area director of OSHA’s Birmingham Area Office. “Employers are responsible for ensuring that their employees have a safe and healthful workplace.”



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