Wireless Sensors Boost Steam Heat

Thursday, October 7, 2010 @ 09:10 AM gHale


Wireless sensors can help save money over the 12 miles of steam lines at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Wireless sensors can help save money over the 12 miles of steam lines at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.


By installing wireless sensors and replacing faulty traps along the 12 miles of steam lines at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, it could save as much as $675,000 per year.
With 1,600 steam traps, which normally open slightly to discharge condensed steam with a negligible loss of live steam, the problem occurs when a trap fails and that failure goes undetected and unrepaired, said Teja Kuruganti, a member of the Computational Sciences and Engineering Division.
Manual inspections of each trap is a daunting and sometimes dangerous task, but by collecting and monitoring data initially from 30 sensors at five steam trap locations, the team of researchers expects to demonstrate significant savings.
ORNL, industrial sites and universities throughout the nation use steam for heating and cooling buildings. A Department of Energy study published in 2005, however, identified faulty steam traps as a major source of energy waste at industrial sites. “Approximately 20 percent of the steam leaving a central boiler plant is lost via leaking traps in typical space heating systems without proactive assessment programs,” according to the report, “Steam Trap Performance Assessment.”
Working with Johnson Controls, ORNL has already repaired or replaced any faulty traps, and is considering expanding the wireless sensor system by installing hundreds of sensors.
“The installation of wireless sensors throughout much of the steam system can give us an early warning of component failures or impending failures,” said Wayne Parker of ORNL’s Utilities Division. “Catching problems as early as possible is essential in minimizing losses and maximizing savings.”



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