Holes in INVT Electric VT-Designer

Friday, November 30, 2018 @ 05:11 PM gHale

INVT Electric is working on a solution to mitigate deserialization of untrusted data and heap-based buffer overflow vulnerabilities in its VT-Designer, according to a report with NCCIC.

Successful exploitation of these vulnerabilities could cause the program to crash and may allow remote code execution. Ariele Caltabiano (kimiya) working with Trend Micro’s Zero Day Initiative (ZDI) reported these vulnerabilities.

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VT-Designer 2.1.7.31 suffers from the remotely exploitable vulnerabilities, according to ZDI. Other versions could also be affected.

The program populates objects with user supplied input via a file without first checking for validity, allowing attacker supplied input to be written to known memory locations. This may cause the program to crash or allow remote code execution.

CVE-2018-18987 is the case number assigned to this vulnerability, which has a CVSS v3 base score of 6.3.

In addition, the program reads the contents of a file (which is already in memory) into another heap-based buffer, which may cause the program to crash or allow remote code execution.

CVE-2018-18983 is the case number assigned to this vulnerability, which has a CVSS v3 base score of 6.3.

The product sees use in the commercial facilities, critical manufacturing, energy, information technology, and transportation systems sectors. It also sees action on a global basis.

No known public exploits specifically target these vulnerabilities. However, an attacker with low skill level could leverage the vulnerabilities.

China-based INVT Electric’s mitigations for these vulnerabilities are not yet available.

NCCIC recommends users take defensive measures to minimize the risk of exploitation of this vulnerability. Specifically, users should:
• Minimize network exposure for all control system devices and/or systems, and ensure that they are not accessible from the Internet.
• Locate control system networks and remote devices behind firewalls, and isolate them from the business network.
• When remote access is required, use secure methods, such as Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), recognizing that VPNs may have vulnerabilities and should be updated to the most current version available. Also recognize that VPN is only as secure as the connected devices.



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